The Limits Of My Language Mean The Limits Of My World (Brené Brown’s “Atlas”)

Brené Brown’s latest book, “Atlas of the Heart,” is a deconstruction of the language we (can/should/could) use to understand our emotions and experiences. Here’s the “limits of my language” quote, what it means, and how “Atlas” applies to ourselves and others, personally and professionally.  Ludwig Wittgenstein said, “The limits of my language mean the limits … Continue reading The Limits Of My Language Mean The Limits Of My World (Brené Brown’s “Atlas”)

Using Content And Context To Lead A Group Towards A Decision (For Parents And Managers)

If you want to understand the meaning of complexity, get two families with young (opinionated) children together and try to figure out where to go for a dinner. Make sure the decision both satisfies feeding the kids something they like AND provides for the parents to have a chance to chat. And they said nuclear … Continue reading Using Content And Context To Lead A Group Towards A Decision (For Parents And Managers)

What The Jefferson Bible Can Teach Us About Marketing

Thomas Jefferson famously took the gospels from the bible, stripped out everything except for Jesus’ words, and said, “A more beautiful or precious morsel of ethics I have never seen; it is a document in proof that I am a real Christian, that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus.” As you … Continue reading What The Jefferson Bible Can Teach Us About Marketing

Damn The Critics: When Gatsby Got Gut-Punched

New York Herald literary critic Isabel Paterson wrote in her review of The Great Gatsby that it was “a book for the season only.” H. L. Mencken at The Chicago Tribune called it “obviously unimportant.” The Dallas Morning News had the best (re: worst, most devastating, gut-punching) comment, “One finishes The Great Gatsby with a … Continue reading Damn The Critics: When Gatsby Got Gut-Punched

Podcast Of The Week: The Fault In Our Birbiglias

Two masters of the amusing but heartfelt story, from two different domains, just hanging out for an hour. Listen for how they each pull and pick at details from their own lives and consider how they apply that level of awareness to their craft. Listen to John Green on the Working It Out podcast with … Continue reading Podcast Of The Week: The Fault In Our Birbiglias

Feelings Are Inherited, Logic Is Learned

Our feelings about most things are mostly inherited. Sometimes positively, sometimes negatively. It’s our upbringing and early life experiences. They give us all sorts of emotional baseline comparisons and nostalgias we’ll use for the rest of our lives. Logic, on the other hand, is always taught. We have to learn systems to override or at … Continue reading Feelings Are Inherited, Logic Is Learned

Nike’s “Stop Eating Like A Pig” Diversity Lesson

Triathlete Joanne Ernst was the first female to say, “Just do it,” in an early 1980s Nike ad. She gave a Marines-esque pep talk and put as strong a female foot forward as the all-male advertising advisors could muster. But, things got messy at the end of the ad. In a last-minute suggestion, they had … Continue reading Nike’s “Stop Eating Like A Pig” Diversity Lesson

Selling Out Of Your Stuff Without Feeling Like A Sell-Out

There’s a famous Nirvana shirt describing the band as, “Flower Sniffin’, Kitty Pettin’, Baby Kissin’ Corporate Rock Whores.” It was a reference to a never-published book about the band, Cobain, and Courtney Love. They successfully blocked the book from ever seeing the light of day in the mid-90s. The phrase was also a cheeky jab … Continue reading Selling Out Of Your Stuff Without Feeling Like A Sell-Out

A Holiday Break From Being Hummingbird Busy

With the holidays approaching, this is your public service announcement to slow down a little bit. I’ve been running on less than a full tank of coffee/gas this year. I’m trying to figure out how to make more time to stop and (responsibly) smell the whiskeys. One of the ways I’m doing it is more … Continue reading A Holiday Break From Being Hummingbird Busy